Remembering Bill Grant

It’s been ten years since my first boss at washingtonpost.com passed away. Bill Grant hired me in October of 1998 as a sports producer. It was my first ‘career’ job out of college. I suppose it helped that I lived right down the street from him, and had been recommended by another employee who was one of my former journalism professors, but I’d like to think I earned it.

I worked in the sports department for a couple of years, trying to make my mark on the company and get promoted to bigger and better things (a part-time sports producer doesn’t make much money). Bill allowed me to do that, giving me opportunity after opportunity to excel, and he taught me many lessons about journalism that I still use today.

In early 2007, after he found out he was sick, he brought me back to work part time in the sports department, though I had moved on to a different company. I accepted, often working Friday nights after leaving my day job.

Today, I’m back at The Post. Many of the things I did and learned in those first few years, under his direction, left a lasting impression and I’ll never forget him.

Via his wife, Tracy Grant: I was my husband’s caregiver as he was dying of cancer. It was the best seven months of my life.

Stilts

When I was a kid, I had a pair of stilts. I believe I got them for Hanukkah, probably in 1985 or 1986, and worked my way up to the highest notch in the wood. It got boring just walking around so I taught myself some tricks, like like spinning one around, and tossing one to the ground while staying up for a minute or so without falling.

I’m not sure what happened to them – last I saw them they were in the corner of the garage, and I probably haven’t used them in more than 20 years, but I’m sure I still know how – just like riding a bike.

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